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Here are Japan’s Coolest Pocky Flavors!

Here are Japan’s Coolest Pocky Flavors!

Here are Japan’s Coolest Pocky Flavors!

What is Pocky?

Pocky is one of the most unassuming but perfect of all Japanese sweets. It consists of a light biscuit stick made with a buttery bread dough. In its original form, it is dipped in a thin coating of milk chocolate.

If there were a Japanese candy Hall of Fame, Pocky would be in it. Pocky sticks, which are made by Glico, have graced the Japanese candy landscape since 1966. They come in packaging that contains just enough cookie sticks to pass around to friends. Pocky—pronounced more like “pokey” in Japanese—gets its name from the snapping sound that the crunchy biscuit makes when you bite into it: pokkin pokkin! (ポッキンポッキン)

Why is Pocky so Popular?

Aside from its satisfying taste and texture, Pocky has great engineering. Unlike many types of Japanese candy and confectionary, Pocky is easy to eat on the go. You know how other chocolate candy melts all over your hands? Well, Pocky doesn’t do this because of the simple but revolutionary idea they had to make a sort of handle at the end of the stick. You can nibble your way down to the end of the stick, all the while keeping your fingers chocolate-free. Brilliant.

Pocky is also popular because of all the tasty and interesting flavors that have made an appearance over the years, such as cookies and cream, matcha green tea, and chocolate banana, to name a few.

Cool Pocky Flavors

Here are some delicious and inspirational flavors to try:

Pocky: Tsubu Tsubu Strawberry—This Pocky is fun and fruity. It has the classic chocolate coating but also has the sweet and tart addition of scrumptious strawberry. It even has little bits of berry to give it a delightful texture, thus the tsubu tsubu reference, meaning seedy or grainy nubbins.

Pocky: Tsubu Tsubu Strawberry

Pocky: Winter Golden Butter Caramel—This Pocky, which is only available in winter, features a bread stick with an extra buttery flavor and a coating of slightly salty caramel-infused chocolate. Although rich in flavor, it is still the cheeky little snack stick that everyone can enjoy.

Pocky: Winter Golden Butter Caramel

Pocky: Almond Crush—This Pocky version has the usual light and delicate biscuit, this time dipped in milk chocolate that has been rolled in toasted, crushed almonds. If you like a nutty flavor, crunchy texture, and a double layer of chocolate, this one’s for you.

Pocky: Almond Crush

Pocky: Sakura Matcha—This Pocky was created to go with the cherry blossom (sakura) season, which occurs in the spring in Japan. The biscuit has a light pink coloring and it is dipped in a matcha green tea veneer to capture all that sakura season brings to mind. Although it’s hard to describe the symbolism and importance of sakura and matcha for Japanese people, this Pocky comes close.

Pocky: Sakura Matcha

Do the Hokey “Pocky” and Get Yourself Some Snacks

A great way to experience all that Pocky has to offer is to hop onto Bokksu Market, where you can click on what grabs your fancy and get it delivered to directly to your house. You can also order a larger Japanese snack box or Japanese candy box that is filled with your favorite assortment of goodies.

If you’re curious about trying other Japanese snacks and treats, we recommend that you subscribe to Bokksu’s Japanese snack subscription box. You will get a curated box of 20-24 candies, snacks, and teas made from high quality Japanese artisanal makers that is deposited right on your doorstep every month. Those who subscribe before the end of March will get the limited edition Sakura Season box. It’s filled with spring-themed treats such as sakura mochi, plum rice crackers, green tea, and much more.

By Megan Taylor Stephens

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